Get Out: The Tesla workshop

Game experience: GOOD
Immersion4,0 stars    Puzzles   4,0 stars    Hosting   3,5 stars
Plus Minus
A well integrated ‘electricity’ theme. The common introduction for several groups and the gamemaster entering the room.

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Orléans - Get Out - Atelier Tesla - logo getout-orleans

Get out is a franchised escape game venue present in various cities across France, such as Orléans, Lille, Reims, Amiens, Cherbourg, Toulouse… and even in Liège (Belgium) and La Réunion (non metropolitan France)! Until recently, they were all featuring two rooms: the Cunningham case (‘L’Affaire Cunningham’ in French, which I have played, and will review some day) and the Panic room. Recently, a few venues started replacing the Panic room by the ‘Tesla workshop’ (‘L’atelier Tesla’) – including the one in Orléans, where I was for the day to visit a friend. We went there to try this new scenario.

Orléans - Get Out - Atelier Tesla - logo

The welcome was friendly. A first gamemaster explained the rule and scenario to both our group and another group who was playing the ‘Cunningham case’ at the same time though, which I thought was not ideal for the immersion. Then, a second gamemaster entered the room with us to give us a few rules, which also spoiled a bit the immersion.

Orléans - Get Out - Atelier Tesla - sépia - hi def.png

We played agents hired by Thomas Edison to enter his rival Nicolas Tesla’s office and steal from him three secret plans – and of course, we have only one hour to do so. Wait, do we really have to steal ideas from the lonely genius Tesla to bring it to the (supposedly) ruthless businessman Edison? It looks like it. Well, whatever…

Orléans - Get Out - Atelier Tesla - bubble - pxb1280.jpg

The decors in the room are nice, and a few additional electric-themed objected reinforce the immersion in the Nicolas Tesla’s office environment. The scenario, however, could have been more developed – in particular, the struggle between Edison and Tesla could have led to interesting developments. A somewhat anachronistic TV screen provides the remaining time and the clues, but it featured early 20th century graphics, that did not spoil too much the immersion; a contemporary heater was a bit out of place in the room though.

Some of the puzzles were relatively classical, but fun to solve, and all were well integrated in the electro-magnetic theme of the room. There were a few padlocks, but not too many. The puzzle structure was not too linear, and therefore would probably fit for larger groups.

Orléans - Get Out - Atelier Tesla - electric ball - pxb1280.jpg

The gamemaster asks you before the start of your adventure to settle an upper limit to the number of hints you can receive, between 5 and 10. I find this system quite puzzling, as there is no incentive to choose anything but a limit of 10, and simply not use all of them if they are not needed. Anyway eventually, we didn’t need any hint to escape the room. A small problem in our session is that we opened a padlock and performed a small manipulation correctly by pure chance, and I suspect that this was due to the gamemaster not resetting the system correctly (maybe he only changed one digit on the padlock when closing it).

Orléans - Get Out - Atelier Tesla - electricity 2 - pxb1280.jpg

Finally, it was nice to discuss about the escape game landscape around Orléans with the first gamemaster. Overall, this was a good escape room, that should be a both a good introduction for beginners, as well as interesting for more experienced players. So which adventure should you play: Cunningham or Tesla? Cunningham has a better scenario but Tesla has a more immersive theme. I recommend both.

Game played on January 2018

Other reviews (in French): Escape game France, Escape game Paris, Escape addict, Allo Escape

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